Maple sugaring events continue this coming weekend at dozens of farms in the Finger Lakes region

Sisters Avalon and Lakie Salter tried out all the tools used in tapping maple trees during Maple Sugaring events Sunday at Cumming Nature Center. The girls from Rochester (Avalon, 10, and Lakie, 14) weren’t the only ones enjoying a hands-on experience with maple syrup production. Kids of all ages and plenty of adults took to the trails on Sunday at the nature center in South Bristol to learn all about how one of New York’s sweetest products is made.

Sunday marked the final day for the center’s two consecutive weekends of maple sugaring. But that doesn’t mean it’s too late for those wanting a taste of the business. Statewide, some 150 maples producers will open their doors again this coming weekend for tours, samples, pancake breakfasts and more.
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This was the nature center’s 39th annual Maple Sugaring event at the Gulick Road site that operates as part of the Rochester Museum and Science Center. Guides along the trails included area high school students such as Hayden Myers and Seth Price of Naples who showed how maple syrup was made in pioneer days. Ian Stave of Farmington kept the wood stove going in the sugar house to boil the sap into syrup. On average, it takes about 40 gallons of sap to produce one gallon of syrup — but their was no shortage of the delectable treat poured into taste samples for the dozens of families who passed through the sugar house on Sunday.

Last year, maple production in New York state broke a record at 700,000 gallons. New York is the nation’s number two producer with more than 2.5 million taps in production.

For more information and to find producers for Maple Weekend, visit