Parents at Wayne Central got a chance Monday night to ask questions about a plan that could close two schools in the district. The district is considering multiple plans including one that could close Freewill and Ontario schools. The superintendent said the biggest factor driving change in the district: Declining enrollment. In the past ten years the district has lost 500 students.

Parents at Wayne Central got a chance Monday night to ask questions about a plan that could close two schools in the district.

The district is considering multiple plans including one that could close Freewill and Ontario schools. The superintendent said the biggest factor driving change in the district: Declining enrollment. In the past ten years the district has lost 500 students.

"I want us to understand tonight, I'm really trying to do my best to maintain what we need for our kids, but first we have to understand, 'how did we get here,'" says Wayne Central Superintendent Dr. Mathis Calvin.

Dr. Calvin went over the results of a district audit that painted a picture for parents. In addition to declining enrollment, district reserves are low, buses are only 60 percent full, and district buildings are aging. Wayne Central has more space and more teachers than it needs. It was a grim picture that showed parents why drastic change is needed.

"I understand everybody is frustrated, I get it," said Dr. Calvin. "I understand; I've been doing this for quite some time. Kids are very important to me. Your children are very important to me. In the middle of the frustration everybody, there is an answer."

The superintendent has been meeting with district leaders for several months now to determine where the district could cut and trim to maintain programs. Five options have emerged. The options all include closing at least one school. The fifth option or "Option E" would close two schools: Freewill and Ontario elementary schools.

"Please do not overcrowd our schools," one speaker said at a meeting on Monday. "Please do not let middle school, grades 6 through 8, disappear. I am completely against scenario, I find it very extreme."

"We already voted on this a few years back and it was voted down," said another speaker. "I don't think a lot of these people appreciate the tact by going about it this way. This is the wrong way to go about it."

"Budgets are usually voted on by the general public and this is going to be a Board of Education decision and I call that into question,” said another person speaking at the meeting. “If it does have to be a Board of Education decision; I implore you, please, do not consider Option E.”

The district has not made a decision on any options. The superintendent said he would weigh the feedback Monday night from parents. However, the board isn't scheduled to take a vote until November.